Facile Development of Nanostructured Photocatalysts for CO2 Capture and Conversion

Wei-Ning Wang*
Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, 800 E. Leigh St., Richmond, Virginia, United States of America
Nano-Micro Conference, 2017, 1, 01047
Published Online: 27 October 2017 (Abstract)
DOI:10.11605/cp.nmc2017.01047
Corresponding Author. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

How to Cite

Citation Information: Wei-Ning Wang, Facile Development of Nanostructured Photocatalysts for CO2 Capture and Conversion. Nano-Micro Conference, 2017, 1, 01047 doi: 10.11605/cp.nmc2017.01047

History

Received: 30 May 2017, Accepted: 17 June 2017, Published Online: 27 October 2017

Abstract

The continuous reliance on fossil fuel-based energy is inevitable. Rational strategies to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are thus highly demanded. Developing efficient photocatalysts that can harness solar energy appears to be a promising methodology to capture and recycle CO2 as a fuel feedstock. The conversion efficiency of the current photocatalysts, however, is generally very low due to various limiting factors, such as fast electron-hole recombination rates, narrow light absorption range, and backward reactions. Thus, developing strategies to overcome the above limitations is an important task in this field.

Here we present several strategies through controlled synthesis to address the aforementioned limitations toward enhancing the overall CO2 conversion efficiency. Examples of novel photocatalysts being explored include mesoporous nanocomposite particles (i.e., Cu-TiO2-SiO2) [1,2], 1D structured Pt-TiO2 thin films [3], CuO-ZnO heterojunction nanowires [4], and crumpled graphene-based nanoballs [5,6]. Systematic materials characterization and photocatalysis analysis of the materials, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, gas chromatography, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, and femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy, aid in understanding the quantitative CO2 photoreduction pathways and the correlations between materials properties and CO2 photoreduction performance.

References

[1] W.N. Wang; J. Park; P. Biswas, Rapid synthesis of nanostructured Cu-TiO2-SiO2 composites for CO2 photoreduction by evaporation driven self-assembly. Catalysis Science & Technology. 1, 593-600 (2011). doi:10.1039/C0CY00091D
[2] Y. Li; W.N. Wang; Z.L. Zhan; M.H. Woo; C.Y. Wu; P. Biswas, Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 with H2O on mesoporous silica supported Cu/TiO2 catalysts. Applied Catalysis B: Environmental. 100, 386-392 (2010). doi:10.1016/j.apcatb.2010.08.015
[3] Wei-Ning Wang; Woo-Jin An; Balavinayagam Ramalingam; Somik Mukherjee; Dariusz M. Niedzwiedzki; Shubhra Gangopadhyay; Pratim Biswas, Size and structure matter: enhanced CO2 photoreduction efficiency by size-resolved ultrafine Pt nanoparticles on TiO2 single crystals. Journal of the American Chemical Society. 134, 11276-11281 (2012). doi:10.1021/ja304075b
[4] Wei-Ning Wang; Fei Wu; Yoon Myung; Dariusz M. Niedzwiedzki; Hyung Soon Im; Jeunghee Park; Parag Banerjee; Pratim Biswas, Surface engineered CuO nanowires with ZnO islands for CO2 photoreduction. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. 7, 5685-5692 (2015). doi:10.1021/am508590j
[5] W. N. Wang; Y. Jiang; J. Fortner; P. Biswas, Nanostructured graphene-titanium dioxide composites synthesized by a single-step aerosol process for photoreduction of carbon dioxide. Environmental Engineering Science. 31, 428 (2014). doi:10.1089/ees.2013.0473
[6] Y. Nie; W. N. Wang; Y. Jiang; J. Fortner; P. Biswas, Crumpled reduced graphene oxide-amine-titanium dioxide nanocomposites for simultaneous carbon dioxide adsorption and photoreduction. Catalysis Science & Technology. 6, 6187-6196 (2016). doi:10.1039/C6CY00828C

Open Access

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
© The Author(s) 2017

[1] W.N. Wang; J. Park; P. Biswas, Rapid synthesis of nanostructured Cu-TiO2-SiO2 composites for CO2 photoreduction by evaporation driven self-assembly. Catalysis Science & Technology. 1, 593-600 (2011). doi:10.1039/C0CY00091D
[2] Y. Li; W.N. Wang; Z.L. Zhan; M.H. Woo; C.Y. Wu; P. Biswas, Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 with H2O on mesoporous silica supported Cu/TiO2 catalysts. Applied Catalysis B: Environmental. 100, 386-392 (2010). doi:10.1016/j.apcatb.2010.08.015
[3] Wei-Ning Wang; Woo-Jin An; Balavinayagam Ramalingam; Somik Mukherjee; Dariusz M. Niedzwiedzki; Shubhra Gangopadhyay; Pratim Biswas, Size and structure matter: enhanced CO2 photoreduction efficiency by size-resolved ultrafine Pt nanoparticles on TiO2 single crystals. Journal of the American Chemical Society. 134, 11276-11281 (2012). doi:10.1021/ja304075b
[4] Wei-Ning Wang; Fei Wu; Yoon Myung; Dariusz M. Niedzwiedzki; Hyung Soon Im; Jeunghee Park; Parag Banerjee; Pratim Biswas, Surface engineered CuO nanowires with ZnO islands for CO2 photoreduction. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. 7, 5685-5692 (2015). doi:10.1021/am508590j
[5] W. N. Wang; Y. Jiang; J. Fortner; P. Biswas, Nanostructured graphene-titanium dioxide composites synthesized by a single-step aerosol process for photoreduction of carbon dioxide. Environmental Engineering Science. 31, 428 (2014). doi:10.1089/ees.2013.0473
[6] Y. Nie; W. N. Wang; Y. Jiang; J. Fortner; P. Biswas, Crumpled reduced graphene oxide-amine-titanium dioxide nanocomposites for simultaneous carbon dioxide adsorption and photoreduction. Catalysis Science & Technology. 6, 6187-6196 (2016). doi:10.1039/C6CY00828C

 

Comments (0)

There are no comments posted here yet

Leave your comments

Posting comment as a guest. Sign up or login to your account.
Attachments (0 / 3)
Share Your Location