Growth of TMDC Nanostructures by Chemical Vapor Deposition

Toshihiro Shimada,* Mengting Weng, Takashi Yanase, Sho Watanabe, Fumiya Uehara, Taro Nagahama
Division of Applied Chemistry, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Hokkaido, Japan
Nano-Micro Conference, 2017, 1, 01024
Published Online: 14 October 2017 (Abstract)
DOI:10.11605/cp.nmc2017.01024
Corresponding Author. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

How to Cite

Citation Information: Toshihiro shimada, Mengting Weng, Takashi Yanase, Sho Watanabe, Fumiya Uehara, Taro Nagahama, Growth of TMDC Nanostructures by Chemical Vapor Deposition. Nano-Micro Conference, 2017, 1, 01024 doi: 10.11605/cp.nmc2017.01024

History

Received: 31 May 2017, Accepted: 17 June 2017, Published Online: 14 October 2017

Abstract

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a simple but powerful technique to synthesize thin films of various materials. It can also be used to synthesize nano-structured materials if it is used with nano-structured templates or catalysts. We have developed separate flow CVD system to make multilayered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) or doped layers [1,2]. We used the apparatus to make nanocomposite between carbon nanotube and MoS2 that was applied to photovoltaic applications (Figure 1) [3]. We also describe the search for the catalysts to make TMDC nanostructures.

Fig1

Figure 1. (a) Separate flow CVD [1,2] (b) TEM image and (c) Raman spectrum of MoS2 nano flakes grown on carbon nanotube bandles [3].

 

References

[1] T. Yanase; S. Watanabe; M. Weng; T. Nagahama; T. Shimada, Chemical vapor deposition of MoS2: Insight into the growth mechanism by separated gas flow experiments. Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. 16, 3223-3227 (2016). doi:10.1166/jnn.2016.12313
[2] T. Yanase; S. Watanabe; M. Weng; M. Wakeshima; Y. Hinatsu; T. Nagahama; T. Shimada, Chemical Vapor Deposition of NbS2 from a Chloride Source with H2 Flow: Orientation Control of Ultrathin Crystals Directly Grown on SiO2/Si Substrate and Charge Wave Transition. Crystal Growth & Design. 16, 4467–4472 (2016). doi:10.1021/acs.cgd.6b00601
[3] I. Jeon; D. Kutsuzawa; Y. Hashimoto; T. Yanase; T. Nagahama; T. Shimada; Y. Matsuo, Multilayered MoS2 Nanoflakes Bound to Carbon Nanotubes as Electron Acceptors in Bulk Heterojunction Inverted Organic Solar Cells. Organic Electronics. 17, 275-280 (2015). doi:10.1016/j.orgel.2014.12.025

Open Access

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
© The Author(s) 2017

[1] T. Yanase; S. Watanabe; M. Weng; T. Nagahama; T. Shimada, Chemical vapor deposition of MoS2: Insight into the growth mechanism by separated gas flow experiments. Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. 16, 3223-3227 (2016). doi:10.1166/jnn.2016.12313
[2] T. Yanase; S. Watanabe; M. Weng; M. Wakeshima; Y. Hinatsu; T. Nagahama; T. Shimada, Chemical Vapor Deposition of NbS2 from a Chloride Source with H2 Flow: Orientation Control of Ultrathin Crystals Directly Grown on SiO2/Si Substrate and Charge Wave Transition. Crystal Growth & Design. 16, 4467–4472 (2016). doi:10.1021/acs.cgd.6b00601
[3] I. Jeon; D. Kutsuzawa; Y. Hashimoto; T. Yanase; T. Nagahama; T. Shimada; Y. Matsuo, Multilayered MoS2 Nanoflakes Bound to Carbon Nanotubes as Electron Acceptors in Bulk Heterojunction Inverted Organic Solar Cells. Organic Electronics. 17, 275-280 (2015). doi:10.1016/j.orgel.2014.12.025

 

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